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 Edward Sharp & Sons Ltd. catalogue with Dalek chocolate novelty

Edward Sharp & Sons Ltd. catalogue with Dalek chocolate novelty

Inevitably, there was also a variety of Dalek confectionery available in 1965. While there are no known surviving examples of the actual products, which included Dalek Jelly Babies from Bellamy’s Ltd., Dalek chocolate bars from Cavenham Confectionery/Goodies Ltd., and foil-wrapped chocolate Dalek novelties from Edward Sharp & Sons Ltd., there are at least examples of advertising materials for the chocolate bars and chocolate novelties. Contemporary reports also mention a Dalek Easter egg, Dalek milk gums, and TARDIS toffee but no further material is known to survive on these products.

More vinyl records were produced during 1965. Parlophone Ltd. released a 7-inch instrumental single titled "Landing of the Daleks" by the Earthlings, and Polydor released the instrumental "Dance of the Daleks" by the Jack Dorsey Orchestra. "The Eccentric Dr. Who" by the Malcolm Lockyer Orchestra released by Columbia was a reworked version of the theme to the AARU film "Doctor Who and the Daleks," and Roberta Tovey took advantage of her role in the film as the Doctor’s granddaughter to release a single titled "Who’s Who" on Polydor.

A number of books were also published in 1965. Frederick Muller published 2nd and 3rd impressions of "Doctor Who: In an Exciting Adventure with the Daleks" with variant dustjackets from the first edition. A paperback version of the same novel was published by Armada Paperbacks, a division of Mayfair Books Ltd. Frederick Muller also published an adaptation of The Crusade as "Doctor Who and the Crusaders" and an adaptation of The Web Planet as "Doctor Who and the Zarbi." Panther Books Ltd. in association with Souvenir Press Ltd. released their second annual-style book, "The Dalek World," as well as a paperback titled "The Dalek Pocketbook and Space-Travellers Guide." World Distributors published the first "Doctor Who Annual." The gallery also includes images of a cover for the first Doctor Who Annual that was rejected by the BBC; likely for its unapproved use of a Dalek.

 Black and grey versions of the Herts Moulders Ltd. plastic Daleks

Black and grey versions of the Herts Moulders Ltd. plastic Daleks

However, the most significant aspect of merchandising in 1965 was the explosion of Doctor Who and the Daleks games and toys. Toy Daleks emerged in a variety of forms. Louis Marx reissued the 6½-inch battery operated Dalek with robot action in moulded black and grey plastic; ultimately replacing the blue fender with a dark grey fender on the grey version. The battery-operated Dalek subsequently reappeared in new packaging later in 1965. Marx also produced a 6½-inch friction drive Dalek in black and grey and a 4½-inch friction drive Dalek, also in black and grey. The most popular in the Marx range, however, were the Dalek Rolykins. Available in three colours—black, silver, and red—they stood about an inch tall with detachable appendages and a ball bearing in the base that allowed them to glide around on flat surfaces. Prototypes also exist of a 2-inch Rolykin and 2-inch and 3-inch Daleks planned for the Marx Rockykins range. Also popular were the Dalek Swapits from Cherilea Toys Ltd. These 2½-inch models comprised three separate sections–a base, middle, and top–and detachable appendages and came in several different colours. Herts Plastic Moulders Ltd. released grey and black 7-inch plastic Daleks exclusively through F. W. Woolworth stores; Newfeld Ltd. added a Dalek to their Bendy Toys range; and Selcol Products Ltd. sold a 12-inch polythene Dalek Nursery Toy, with a detachable eyestalk, arm, and gun that were surely a choking hazard for small children. Cowan, de Groot through their Codeg Toys range added both blue and black clockwork Daleks. 

 Anti-Dalek Sonic Disintegrator from Lincoln International Ltd.

Anti-Dalek Sonic Disintegrator from Lincoln International Ltd.

Toy guns were also a popular addition to the range of Doctor Who and Dalek merchandise. Lincoln International Ltd. was the most prolific in this area with "Dr. Who’s Anti-Dalek Fluid Neutraliser" and "Dr. Who’s Anti-Dalek Jet Immobiliser," both water pistols; "Dr. Who’s Anti-Dalek Sonic Disintegrator," that fired plastic darts; and "Dr. Who’s Anti-Dalek Neutron Exterminator," a 3-foot long gun that fired plastic missiles. Additionally, Lone Star Products Ltd. produced a "Dalek Rocket Gun," and Bell Toys Ltd. sold "Doctor Who’s “Astro Ray” Dalek Gun."

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